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Taurus G3 Problems [& Solutions]

When it comes to budget-friendly handguns, Taurus is one of the more well-known brands around. They have been working hard to revamp and improve their striker-fired pistols, starting with the G2. They took all of the best elements of the G2 and put the same firing system in the new and improved Taurus G3. The longer slide, heftier frame, and four-inch barrel, combined with the highly affordable price point make this one of the more popular handguns available.

Taurus Firearms Logo

While there are a ton of perks that come with using this particular firearm, it does come with some challenges. It’s important that potential Taurus customers are aware that the G3 is not perfect, although it is a pretty nice gun. Let’s take a closer look at some of the common issues that people come across upon purchasing the Taurus G3:


Taurus G3 Pistol

The Taurus G3 is a full-size striker-fired 9mm pistol that comes with both a standard 15-round mag that fits flush in the firearm, as well as the extended 17-round magazine. There is also another version available that comes with either two 10-round magazines or two 15-round magazines, for those that live in areas that have restrictions on magazine capacity.

One of the most important things that you need in any firearm, especially one that is being carried for protection, is reliability. Overall, the G3 is a decent pistol, but there are some fairly common issues that customers have run into while using it.

Failure to Feed

One of the most widespread issues that people come across with the Taurus G3 is the failure to feed. This problem seems to be influenced by the type of ammo that is being used. Many users find that they have an easier time utilizing brass-cased bullets, with nickel alloy casing giving them more trouble. The problem with this is that the hollow point gets jammed in the feed ramp, resulting in the bullet not being able to enter the battery normally.

Fortunately, there is a way that many individuals have found to remedy the problem: Several customers have had better luck with their firearm after disassembling it and polishing the feed ramp really well. This lubrication allows the bullets to slide much more easily, resulting in smoother shooting with far fewer jams.

Dealing With A Jam

If your Taurus G3 does become jammed, a cartridge or shell case may end up stuck in the pistol, which can result in an inability to operate the pistol or a dangerous operational state. If you’ve experienced a jam, there are some simple steps that you can perform to easily clear the jam and bring the pistol back to its working state.

  1. Ensure the muzzle of the pistol is pointed in a safe direction, as the gun is still considered to be loaded and ready to fire until properly cleared.
  2. Be sure that your finger is off the trigger and placed on the memory pad.
  3. Press the magazine release and remove the magazine. If the magazine will not release, you may need to pull the slide back further or engage the slide catch, and if stuck the magazine may need to be gently pulled out.
  4. Once the magazine is removed, ensure the slide is pulled all the way back and locked into place.
  5. Remove the jammed cartridge or casing by either shaking or manually removing it.
  6. In situations where a round is stuck and cannot easily be manually removed, you may need to slide a cleaning rod down the barrel to dislodge it.
  7. Verify that the gun has been cleared, that the barrel and battery are empty, and the gun can be considered unloaded and safe.

One caveat to clearing a jam, however, is that if the jam occurred due to the pistol being dropped or otherwise struck, the firearm should be taken to a trained and licensed gunsmith or armorer for a full functionality and safety check.

Heats Up Quickly

If you’re a fan of fast-firing when you hit the shooting range, you may want to rethink this particular handgun. When you’re shooting at a leisurely pace, it usually stays pretty cool, but when you start firing more rapidly, the gun heats up quickly. After 2-3 magazines worth of firing, the slide becomes hot to the touch. This can be problematic because you have to allow time for it to cool before you proceed with shooting. This is typical for most firearms.

The best way to avoid this is by not firing the gun too quickly. Using it for target practice, small game hunting, or plinking is fine, but it’s best to avoid rapidly firing this particular handgun. If you notice the barrel overheats, this can lead to damage that results in loss of accuracy.

Not Left-Hand Friendly

Back view of a Taurus G3 pistol showing the grip

Unfortunately, many things in this world are made for those that are right-handed. Many lefties have figured out how to do some things right-handed, but when it comes to firing a gun, it’s important to shoot it whichever way is more comfortable. The downside here is that the safety on the Taurus G3 is positioned for right-handed people to easily use, and they do not offer a left-handed or ambidextrous option.

This gun does feature a front drop safety, but the only way that this would be useful is if the safety lever is off. This can be quite dangerous, and it is never recommended to carry a firearm with the safety disengaged. If you are left-handed, it would be a smart idea to find a gun that is suited for ambidextrous or left-handed users.

Our Verdict

The Taurus G3 is widely respected as an incredibly reliable gun, even though it does have a few relatively minor issues. These issues are minimized even more when you consider the average cost of a G3, and how affordable they are when compared to other high-end pistols that we tend to use as benchmarks.

While the seemingly-unavoidable right-handedness is a downer for southpaws, the failure-to-feed issues and the G3’s tendency to heat up can both be considerably reduced with conscientious ammo choice, shooting technique, and maintenance.

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